Video Games and Marriage

We don’t have hundreds of games for our Wii, but you would think with the way The Hubby and I play this one that it is the only one we own.  This was a Christmas present for the girls last year.  They have played it exactly 2 times….in a year.  In my own defense, it is only a game for two people.  This was a minor detail we overlooked.  While there are only two of them, it isn’t exactly friendly for when their friends come over to spend the night, etc.  Yeah, that’s the story….I’ll stick to that one.
I’ve decided though that Lego Star Wars can be used as a marital aid…….not that kind.  It’s cheaper than counseling, and you would defintely get the husband to agree to a video game faster than counseling.  And as the wife,  you will find perverse pleasure in blowing up creatures and buildings made of Legos.  (I personally love to be Chewbacca because you rip the arms off of the other Lego people, and it makes a popping noise just like real Legos.)
You are probably wondering why a video game would help with a marriage.  Well, communication is pretty critical in this game when playing with a partner.  If you aren’t communicating, you are dying.  And, since it is a kid-friendly game, dying doesn’t end the game….it just prolongs it.  Communication in the game is pretty simple.  Since you are working together to accomplish and objective (a couple of objectives really), you have to both be talking to each other.    “I see the canister over there.”  “Let’s kill off these droids first, then get the tokens.” 
And, it does help that the players are linked together.  While you don’t have to stay right next to each other, one player gets too far away, it will prevent anyone from doing anything. Think of it as you are connected to each other by a length of rope.  So, you have to use such phrases as: “Let’s explore to the left first.”
Shared problem solving is another skill you will learn as a married couple when playing Lego Star Wars.  If you see a canister (a prized find in this game), you have to figure out how to get it. Sometimes it is pretty clear – others it is not.  Again, it takes communication & sharing ideas to get it.  And, when you do, there is a sense of accomplishment.
Some levels also teach self-sacrafice.  In marriage, there are times where one person needs to be the focus for that moment. It may be school, a project at work, or a health issue.  That’s when the other person steps up and does more without worrying it is fair, etc.  In the game, there are times when someone needs to bow out for a portion of the level.  For me, I am horrible at jumping – so when faced with a lot of jumping obstacles, I have to usually bow out and let the Hubby carry me.  There are other times where I have been better at something than he is, so he bows out and let’s me carry us.  Again, it takes communiucation and problem solving. 
I would be lying if I said that the Hubby and I are perfect at this game.  Despite all of the time playing, there are still conversations like this: “Are you going to let me know what you think you are going to try so that I can go the same direction?”  or “What are you doing??” 

While I have never felt the Hubby and I have needed counseling (despite my control freak-ish issues), I think of this game as having kept the sword sharp, so to speak.  And, the experts say that video games overstimulate the mind especially before bed.  So after conquering the world, you can go re-enact the Princess Leia scene in Return of the Jedi.  Oh, God……I’m starting to sound like the Hubby!

3 Comments Add yours

  1. Audrey says:

    Lego video games are my favorite… I like to play them…

  2. nitebyrd says:

    Years ago I beat my now ex-husband at Dragon Warrior. He still hasn’t forgiven me. LOL That was the last video game I played they’ve become to advanced for me. Glad y’all had some fun “role-playing” this Thanksgiving! 😉

  3. Jennybean says:

    we just got a wii… maybe we will have to give this a try…

What do you think?